Thabang Molefe

I explore how change within the self is influenced by the external environment and vice versa. I depict how these changes occur through daily experiences and how the process happens in the emotions, thoughts, instincts and spirituality.

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Elgin Rust

Under the title of Post-Plastic, I explore and reassess our relationship with our environment. I attempt to highlight how materials we create to make our lives easier are impacting our physical and mental health. Plastic, originally applauded as a cheap saviour of humanity has turned out to be our number one pollutant, its toxic contents seeping into every pore of our existence. Using inflatable objects as my starting point, I explore what plastic means for our society in the long run. Armed with a collection of other peoples' “pool party trash”, discarded pool toys such as balls, lilos, armbands, and rings, I use these objects by applying art processes directly to them, capturing forms that could be termed “post plastic”. My ongoing fascination with inflatable objects either used as toys or swimming aids conjures images of happy family summer days by the pool. Added these may evoke tragic migrant journeys towards a better life and the associated cost of living. These notions are immortalized through processes applied to the original object and in this manner the works speak more loosely of time and transformation. Thus the prints and sculptures attempt to record the darker side of the plastic inflatable. Originally associated with safe family fun, the process I apply turns the idea of the inflatable inside out. By casting the object in concrete, it becomes devoid of warmth and despite its tactile shape, it is far from safe. This creates a sense of the uncanny, imbuing an ordinary object with emotive power. Thus the work can be understood to stand in for people. The sculptural surfaces bear witness to ruination, conveying the notion of the last breath. In this way, the series speaks of the process of deconstruction, of lives post a traumatic event.

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Mzoxolo Vimba

Sunday best, Kakade! Is an attempt to take away the power of representation from the photographer to the subject. The series comes after reading Susan Sontag’s essay -Regarding the pain of others; Here she argues against objectivity in photographs and contends that the photographer yields all the power. The series is inspired by Ntate Santu Mofokeng's Black photo album and the lifetime work of Seydou Keita. It is about showing how Black people in townships around Johannesburg seek to represent themselves by letting them choose their photo setting and where it's taken. The title Sunday best is inspired by the popular black south African saying “Sunday Best", meaning you look really good or are in your entire splendor and glory as the word Sunday would to some usually suggest. I am interested in how the series can grow to respond, work with and or critique the works of Mofokeng and Keita. The point is to find out how different people look at themselves through photography without taking away people’s urgency and whether or not that is possible. The Xhosa word Kakade, meaning "vele" or "of cause", comes as an affirmation of pride and or appreciation of one's personhood' be it in the moment of the photo-shoot or in perpetuity. In this series, I intend to work with and against this statement and discover if representation can go beyond the photographer's perception, especially in townships where media has created an already existing image. Secondly, I would like to see if collaborating with one's subjects as a photographer is possible. Furthermore I would like to see if the creation of a new “image” of the township/blacks is something to even concern oneself about or it’s just a waste of time.

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Dodaizm

Fragmented Bodies II is originally a five A3 series on cartridge paper. This series shows my interest in the fragmented and/or distorted body (particularly the female body) by experimenting with collage and thread with each of the works consisting of broken women bodies stitched together with black thread. Fragmented Bodies II explores the emotional distortion imposed by a physical act, looking at what it means to understand trauma in terms of affect coming to rest in a body, rather than proceeding from the body (Bennet, 2005). Fragmented Bodies II talks about the infliction of pain on women and children in South Africa, the broken and the scarred woman body. The fear and anxiety of women in South Africa, in relation to the #AMINEXT? movement, is revealed in this series. I do, however, find that when staring at the work for so long, there is more to the work than I say or express. The work carries a lot of secrets, it carries my pain; the things I have been through, which no one knows of or will ever get to know or understand about me. One starts to see and feel the influence of my pain and insecurities. It is as if I am exposing myself but in a safe and secretive way, communicating the process of healing and purification by the use of stitches. This series is very violent, yet carthetic. It recalls my vulnerabilities, their heavens and hells, which helps me not reject the self but visit and highlight these vulnerabilities to help myself heal.

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Nina Erasmus

The approach of my collages has always been to give new life to the old and forgotten. I always find myself thinking about the forgotten coffee table books that have not been looked at in 5 years, dreaming of the possibilities they hold. Further more collaging, for me is also a reflection of what is published at a specific time. It's obvious to say: The books i got in Belgium, while i was living there are different to the one's here in SA. I like that my work is mirror to that along with my own experience. I like how the size of the page bring people closer for further inspection, how they are draw to the narrative they get from looking at my work. I like my pages to dictate my choices, it's quite freeing to open myself up to the possibilities and to listen to what you are seeing. It's quite a spontaneous process and the stories might come before i start cutting or after i have pasted. But, for me, the pages are boss and dyslexic brain is there to make the connections.

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Deirdre Berkovic

I have many questions about the future of our suburban landscapes. When all is in flux how do we know what to value? How do we understand the complexities of our ecology, our role in the habitats of species or the potential of weeds in the present and future? Pavements, gardens, wasteland, wetland - habitats for a vast web and variety of life. The flow of energy, the ebb of species, the fragility of balance. The wilder places are complicated by anxiety unless you pay for the privilege of safety. Public land is sold off for development or fenced for profit and what remains in the commons is polluted, degraded and often dangerous. Wilderness is available only to the privileged, the brave and the marginalised. In our suburban unease we are either walled in or fenced out. My art is both a meditation and a conduit for anxiety in challenging times.

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Boitumelo Motau

My drawings and paintings are in aims of initiating and maintaining a dialogue between the conscious and the subconscious and subjective world of feeling, experience and memory. I intend on accessing and drawing from both the personal and collective body of thought and experience. Drawing becomes a space to create new narratives whilst conversing with existing personal and historical narratives.

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Hannah Saunders

My work focuses on and explores the identity of South African women but can also apply to women all over the world. This focus encompasses gender based violence, prostitution and women and religion among other similar topics. The aim of all of these works is to create a conversation and convey a message that you cannot shy away from.

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Glen Fisher

The world is saturated with images, saturated with photographs, saturated with photographs of birds and wildlife. But a good deal of bird and wildlife photography is merely literal and representational. 'This is what this creature looks like,' it says. The more interesting work, I think, looks at creatures in their natural settings, or at behaviours. In these images, I am exploring something else. How does one photograph an egret, a spoonbill or kingfisher, an ordinary Cape Weaver, in a way that is aesthetically satisfying, that conveys feeling and emotion, that invites the viewer to contemplate what it is that he or she is looking at, and not merely observe and catalogue?

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Paigen Kotze

My work predominantly comments on the human condition, and those aspects which we choose not to acknowledge. With sub-themes of personal identity and psychology – the work adopts a confrontational nature, emphasizing that which is often hidden. In my process, a great deal of introspection and critical analysis is required. Diving deep down into the core essence of who one is or who one could be opens up the mind to an entirely new way of thinking. This gives one a new perspective on life, and a more critical outlook, making one question the nature of every physical and abstract element of existence and the nature of our humanity as a whole. My aim is to create intriguing images which are beautifully haunting to confront the viewer with certain truths that they may or may not want to acknowledge.

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